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20121208
20121208
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
support the inflammatory flames heard on the floor of the u.s. senate used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as
speaker did give us one flash of hope if you listen to his words very carefully. the u.s. is updating its military plans against syria as new intelligence shows assad's regime is loading sarin gas into bombs. and president obama's pot problem. let's go "outfront." >>> i'm tom foreman in for erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, the magic number after a whole week of harsh words here in washington and threats too, did house speaker john boehner hint ever so slightly at a compromise today that could finally edge us away from the dreaded fiscal cliff? it comes down to tax rates. this is a huge sticking point in the stalled negotiations between the president and mr. boehner. obama says the top rate on household income above $250,000 should rise from 35% to 39.6%. boehner wants the rate to stay at 35% or even lower. but what about meeting in the middle? around 37%? listen carefully to the speaker when he was asked today whether that rate could be the answer to this impasse. >> there are a lot of things that are possible. to put the revenue the president seeks on the table. but none of it's going t
and there is an american connection. u.s. officials are working to figure out if the man played a part in the attack on the consulate in libya that killed four americans, including the u.s. ambassador. the egyptians say their suspect is the leader of a terror network. we're working our sources for you, so stay tuned, live on cnn. >>> and egypt's president could be backing off a power group that led to a national crisis. mohamed morsy says he is willing to change the decree that critics say would give him too much power. the offer would not be enough, though, to satisfy the egyptians furious. at least six people have died in clashes, we'll bring you to cairo for the latest on that. >>> and president obama and house speaker john boehner are talking again. but that is about the only thing close to progress in efforts to avoid the fiscal cliff. president obama used his weekly address insisting he is ready to make the tough decisions on spending cuts. >> i am willing to make more entitlement spending cuts on top of the one trillion in spending cuts i signed into law last year. but if we're serious about
washington got into a budget battle like this? lawmakers put a band aid on the problem and the u.s. lost its aaa credit rating in the process. i warned you about the economic storm headed our way, partly because of europe and partly because of this fiscal cliff. i also told you about an american economic renaissance that could be just ahead. just beyond the storm clouds. the fiscal cliff is fixable. every day washington fails to make a deal, more damage is being done. john king, ken rogath is the former chief economist at the international monetary fund and diane swonk joins us from mezro financial. john, some people say don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done in an 11th hour deal. as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> both sides digging in. you played the president saying, i want that rate hike. the republicans say we'll give you the revenues but not through a rate hike. the president believes he won the election and he upped the ante saying he wants twice as much in tax revenues than he wanted a year and a half ago. the presi
. so jill can keep living the good life. crest. life opens up when you do. >>> the u.s. military has updated its plan for a potential strike against syria, after intelligence showed that the regime has filled aerial bombs with deadly gas. the threat of the chemical weapons attack by a desperate regime adds another layer of fear to a population already terrified by almost two years of civil war. for some living on the front lines, life has been turned upside down. cnn's senior international correspondent reporting from northern syria. >> reporter: down a steep, stone stairway into the darkness, this is where the cordea family has been hiding for four months. >> translator: the strikes were all around us. we just ran out with nothing, 20-year-old faknar recalls. we just ran and ran down here. and the shrapnel was falling all over. >> since then, they've dared occasionally to go back home to collect belongings. there would be bombing like that and we'd come running back here, faknar says. their home is just five doors away. but it's right on one of aleppo's front lines. it's been hit by
make up 13% of the u.s. population. by 2050, they are expected to be 20%. 20%. that means you'll need to spend a lot more on social security and medicare. meanwhile the development of new miracle treatments we hope will keep happening and that will push the cost even higher. the future turns out to be expensive. that's simply the reality of it. and opposing tax increases doesn't change that reality. there's nothing in grover norquist's pledge that stops the aging process. if there was, i would take it. so there's no way the tax receipts of the 1960s will support the demographics of america in the 2020s or the 2030s. anyone who says otherwise is not taking the reality seriously. joining us is a man who always takes reality seriously. chris hayes. >> religiously. >> religiously. so one thing i always think is true in our political discussions is we don't like to face up to big changes. we like to use them as evidence for why whatever policies we support need to happen. but particularly the aging of this society, i don't think we've come anywhere close to thinking about what that will me
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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